WLAN | Information

Get the most out of your WLAN! 

Tips, tricks and useful information about your wireless Internet connection 

 

What do you want to know more about? Click on our topics:

Optimising your WLAN 

Connecting to WLAN

Understanding WLAN

Change WLAN password

Optimising your WLAN

WLAN is a great invention! But only when it works properly. It all comes down to speed, range and stability: We have put together a collection of tips to help you get the most out of your wireless Internet connection.

Modem location

Location of the WLAN modem or Horizon box

Give your WLAN waves space to unfold! Ideally, the modem should be slightly elevated, so that it overcomes furniture and other obstacles.

 

Did you know: The Horizon box works best if it is standing freely and is not in a drawer or on a shelf.

Setting up the WLAN modem ideally | WLAN optimisation | UPC
 
 
Setting up the WLAN modem ideally | WLAN optimisation | UPC
Adjusting the modem correctly | Optimising the WLAN connection | UPC

Facing direction of the WLAN modem or Horizon box

The front of your modem or your TV box (where the light is) should always face into the room. So do not position your modem with the front facing the wall or against a piece of furniture. Ideally, the device should also stand on its “feet” – as intended by the manufacturer.

Adjusting the modem correctly | Optimising the WLAN connection | UPC
 
 

Avoiding sources of interference

Your modem likes its own space. The following devices should not be positioned too close to it, since they interfere with the WLAN:

 

  • Base station of a cordless telephone
  • Baby monitor
  • Microwave
  • Bluetooth devices
  • Security cameras
Sources of WLAN interference | Which devices to avoid | UPC
 
 
Sources of WLAN interference | Which devices to avoid | UPC
Using a LAN cable for a quicker Internet connection | UPC

LAN instead of WLAN

You will obtain the fastest and most stable Internet connection if you connect your computer to the modem or the Horizon box with a network cable (Ethernet) instead of using WLAN. This is a good alternative if you use a stationary computer that is positioned close to the modem or the Horizon box.

 

Background: WLAN stands for Wireless Local Area Network and allows data to be transferred wirelessly. WLAN is used as a synonym for a wireless Internet connection. By contrast, the abbreviation “LAN” (Local Area Network) describes a local network that only covers a limited area and where the data is transferred via a cable. As described above, you can also connect your computer to the modem via a network cable so that you can use the Internet.

Using a LAN cable for a quicker Internet connection | UPC
 
 
 
 
Modem settings

Selecting the optimal WLAN channel

There are different WLAN channels that your modem or your Horizon box can use. For a good connection, select a channel that is little used at your location. The simplest way to find this is with our “WLAN Optimizer”. This is a simple and free program that works out the best channel in your home and makes the change automatically. You can considerably improve the speed of your Internet connection in this way.

 

WLAN Optimizer Windows (Version 1.0.1.33, Vista or higher)

WLAN Optimizer Mac (Version 1.15.1.14, OS X 10.9.x or higher)

WLAN optimiser from UPC | Setting the optimum WLAN channel
 
 
WLAN optimiser from UPC | Setting the optimum WLAN channel
Older devices hinder WLAN performance | Improving WLAN | UPC

Older devices in the WLAN network

If you connect older devices in your WLAN network that do not support the so-called n standard (such as the iPhone 3, Samsung Galaxy GT-i7500, PlayStation 3 and all devices that came onto the market before 2009), these will affect the performance of all devices in the same network. If possible, you should prevent such devices from connecting with your WLAN.

 

N standard: A standard for setting up wireless local networks that allows a long reach because the routers have several aerials and the signals can thus be transmitted multiple times in parallel.

Older devices hinder WLAN performance | Improving WLAN | UPC
 
 

Frequency band:

2.4 GHz or 5 GHz?

A frequency band refers to a particular frequency range within which signals can be sent. WLAN waves can be transmitted via the two frequency bands 2.4 GHZ and 5 GHz. These differ in speed and distance. In short, the 2.4 GHz network radiates further, but is slower. The 5 GHz network is faster, but does not reach so far. Generally speaking, however, the 5 GHz network is used less and therefore offers a better connection.

 

Our tip: Try them both to find out which frequency band works better in your home. You can change the frequency range in the configuration menu on the router. Remember that older devices do not support the 5 GHz band.

Use the 5 GHz network for a better Internet connection | UPC
 
 
Use the 5 GHz network for a better Internet connection | UPC
 
 
WLAN throughout the house?

WLAN throughout the whole house

In larger flats or houses with several floors, the optimisation measures described above are often not sufficient to guarantee stable WLAN reception throughout. In this case, additional devices can help.

 

What is most suitable depends on the situation in your home. Here, we will give you an overview of the possible technologies. We recommend that you seek advice from a specialist dealer.

Powerline

With the Powerline technology, you connect two additional devices using the existing electricity lines. You plug one Powerline device into a plug socket close to the modem or the Horizon box and connect it to the modem. You plug the second Powerline device into a plug socket in another room. By doing this, you will overcome the distance and strengthen the WLAN signal in this room.

 

Our summary: Very suitable for overcoming longer distances, e.g. over several floors. Easy to install.

+ Simple and quick installation

+ Large distances can be overcome

-  Speed is decreased

 
 

Access Point

You can also strengthen your WLAN with the Access Point. You simply connect it to your modem or your Horizon box using a network cable and do not have to configure anything. The latest technologies such as 802.11AC and 5GHz are widely supported.

 

Our summary: The perfect solution for strong WLAN reception in flats. Can also be combined with Powerline to cover several floors.

+ Simple and quick installation

+ Good WLAN coverage

+ Good Internet speed

-  Limited coverage over several floors

 
 

WLAN Repeater

A WLAN repeater picks up the WLAN signal from your modem or your Horizon box and amplifies it. The repeater (unlike the Access Point) can also be in a different room in which you want the WLAN to be amplified. You simply place it within the range of the modem or the Horizon box and connect the two devices.

 

Our summary: Not suitable in every case. We have had better experience with Powerline and Access Point.

+ WLAN coverage in the flat is extended

-  Speed is strongly decreased

-  Installation requires experience

 
 

WLAN Router

A WLAN router is used in a similar way to an Access Point. It offers numerous additional possibilities for network configuration, however, that are only required in certain cases. In this case, the modem must be set to bridge mode. This is not possible on the Horizon box.

 

Our summary: A WLAN router should only be used if you wish to specially configure your network.

+ Good WLAN coverage

+ Good Internet speed

+ Numerous possibilities for network configuration

-  Installation requires specialist knowledge

-  Limited coverage over several floors

Purchasing devices

UPC does not offer any of the named devices directly at present. We recommend that you seek advice from your specialist dealer.

Horizon with a separate modem

If you use a Horizon Box for both TV and Internet/telephone and WiFi is primarily needed in another room, you can activate Internet and telephone on a separate WLAN modem in the other room instead of on the Horizon Box. You need a separate wall socket for this purpose. Please get in touch with us if you would like to do this and all of the requirements are met.

+ Internet/telephone is in a different location to the Horizon Box, provided that a wall socket is available.

- Horizon Box no longer serves as an Internet or telephone connection. You access WiFi from the separate modem.

 
 
 
 

Location of the WLAN modem or Horizon box

Give your WLAN waves space to unfold! Ideally, the modem should be slightly elevated, so that it overcomes furniture and other obstacles.

 

Did you know: The Horizon box works best if it is standing freely and is not in a drawer or on a shelf.

Setting up the WLAN modem ideally | WLAN optimisation | UPC
 
 
Setting up the WLAN modem ideally | WLAN optimisation | UPC
Adjusting the modem correctly | Optimising the WLAN connection | UPC

Facing direction of the WLAN modem or Horizon box

The front of your modem or your TV box (where the light is) should always face into the room. So do not position your modem with the front facing the wall or against a piece of furniture. Ideally, the device should also stand on its “feet” – as intended by the manufacturer.

Adjusting the modem correctly | Optimising the WLAN connection | UPC
 
 

Avoiding sources of interference

Your modem likes its own space. The following devices should not be positioned too close to it, since they interfere with the WLAN:

 

  • Base station of a cordless telephone
  • Baby monitor
  • Microwave
  • Bluetooth devices
  • Security cameras
Sources of WLAN interference | Which devices to avoid | UPC
 
 
Sources of WLAN interference | Which devices to avoid | UPC
Using a LAN cable for a quicker Internet connection | UPC

LAN instead of WLAN

You will obtain the fastest and most stable Internet connection if you connect your computer to the modem or the Horizon box with a network cable (Ethernet) instead of using WLAN. This is a good alternative if you use a stationary computer that is positioned close to the modem or the Horizon box.

 

Background: WLAN stands for Wireless Local Area Network and allows data to be transferred wirelessly. WLAN is used as a synonym for a wireless Internet connection. By contrast, the abbreviation “LAN” (Local Area Network) describes a local network that only covers a limited area and where the data is transferred via a cable. As described above, you can also connect your computer to the modem via a network cable so that you can use the Internet.

Using a LAN cable for a quicker Internet connection | UPC
 
 
 
 

Selecting the optimal WLAN channel

There are different WLAN channels that your modem or your Horizon box can use. For a good connection, select a channel that is little used at your location. The simplest way to find this is with our “WLAN Optimizer”. This is a simple and free program that works out the best channel in your home and makes the change automatically. You can considerably improve the speed of your Internet connection in this way.

 

WLAN Optimizer Windows (Version 1.0.1.33, Vista or higher)

WLAN Optimizer Mac (Version 1.15.1.14, OS X 10.9.x or higher)

WLAN optimiser from UPC | Setting the optimum WLAN channel
 
 
WLAN optimiser from UPC | Setting the optimum WLAN channel
Older devices hinder WLAN performance | Improving WLAN | UPC

Older devices in the WLAN network

If you connect older devices in your WLAN network that do not support the so-called n standard (such as the iPhone 3, Samsung Galaxy GT-i7500, PlayStation 3 and all devices that came onto the market before 2009), these will affect the performance of all devices in the same network. If possible, you should prevent such devices from connecting with your WLAN.

 

N standard: A standard for setting up wireless local networks that allows a long reach because the routers have several aerials and the signals can thus be transmitted multiple times in parallel.

Older devices hinder WLAN performance | Improving WLAN | UPC
 
 

Frequency band:

2.4 GHz or 5 GHz?

A frequency band refers to a particular frequency range within which signals can be sent. WLAN waves can be transmitted via the two frequency bands 2.4 GHZ and 5 GHz. These differ in speed and distance. In short, the 2.4 GHz network radiates further, but is slower. The 5 GHz network is faster, but does not reach so far. Generally speaking, however, the 5 GHz network is used less and therefore offers a better connection.

 

Our tip: Try them both to find out which frequency band works better in your home. You can change the frequency range in the configuration menu on the router. Remember that older devices do not support the 5 GHz band.

Use the 5 GHz network for a better Internet connection | UPC
 
 
Use the 5 GHz network for a better Internet connection | UPC
 
 

WLAN throughout the whole house

In larger flats or houses with several floors, the optimisation measures described above are often not sufficient to guarantee stable WLAN reception throughout. In this case, additional devices can help.

 

What is most suitable depends on the situation in your home. Here, we will give you an overview of the possible technologies. We recommend that you seek advice from a specialist dealer.

Powerline

With the Powerline technology, you connect two additional devices using the existing electricity lines. You plug one Powerline device into a plug socket close to the modem or the Horizon box and connect it to the modem. You plug the second Powerline device into a plug socket in another room. By doing this, you will overcome the distance and strengthen the WLAN signal in this room.

 

Our summary: Very suitable for overcoming longer distances, e.g. over several floors. Easy to install.

+ Simple and quick installation

+ Large distances can be overcome

-  Speed is decreased

 
 

Access Point

You can also strengthen your WLAN with the Access Point. You simply connect it to your modem or your Horizon box using a network cable and do not have to configure anything. The latest technologies such as 802.11AC and 5GHz are widely supported.

 

Our summary: The perfect solution for strong WLAN reception in flats. Can also be combined with Powerline to cover several floors.

+ Simple and quick installation

+ Good WLAN coverage

+ Good Internet speed

-  Limited coverage over several floors

 
 

WLAN Repeater

A WLAN repeater picks up the WLAN signal from your modem or your Horizon box and amplifies it. The repeater (unlike the Access Point) can also be in a different room in which you want the WLAN to be amplified. You simply place it within the range of the modem or the Horizon box and connect the two devices.

 

Our summary: Not suitable in every case. We have had better experience with Powerline and Access Point.

+ WLAN coverage in the flat is extended

-  Speed is strongly decreased

-  Installation requires experience

 
 

WLAN Router

A WLAN router is used in a similar way to an Access Point. It offers numerous additional possibilities for network configuration, however, that are only required in certain cases. In this case, the modem must be set to bridge mode. This is not possible on the Horizon box.

 

Our summary: A WLAN router should only be used if you wish to specially configure your network.

+ Good WLAN coverage

+ Good Internet speed

+ Numerous possibilities for network configuration

-  Installation requires specialist knowledge

-  Limited coverage over several floors

Purchasing devices

UPC does not offer any of the named devices directly at present. We recommend that you seek advice from your specialist dealer.

Horizon with a separate modem

If you use a Horizon Box for both TV and Internet/telephone and WiFi is primarily needed in another room, you can activate Internet and telephone on a separate WLAN modem in the other room instead of on the Horizon Box. You need a separate wall socket for this purpose. Please get in touch with us if you would like to do this and all of the requirements are met.

+ Internet/telephone is in a different location to the Horizon Box, provided that a wall socket is available.

- Horizon Box no longer serves as an Internet or telephone connection. You access WiFi from the separate modem.

 
 
 
 

FAQs & instructions

Here you will find the top 5 FAQs and helpful instructions

 
 

FAQs

 
 
 
 
 
 

Connecting to WLAN

If you have already installed your WLAN modem or Horizon box, you can find out here how to connect your devices to the wireless network. Not yet installed your modem? Antonio will show you how!
Did you know: You can find the network name («SSID») and the password for your WLAN network (if you have not changed it) on the bottom of your modem or your Horizon box.

Android
Connecting WLAN with an Android device | UPC instructions
  • Press the menu button and select «Settings» 
  • Click «Wireless & Networks»
  • Make sure that the «Wi-Fi» check box is selected
  • Select the «Wi-Fi Settings» menu item
  • Select the correct network
  • Enter the password «WPA2-PSK» and complete the process by clicking «Connect»
 
 
iPad & iPhone
WLAN connection with an iPad & iPhone | UPC instructions
  • Select the «Settings» menu item
  • Click on «Wi-Fi»
  • Select the correct network
  • Enter the password «WPA2-PSK» and click on «Connect»
 
 
Mac OS
WLAN connection Mac OS | UPC instructions
  • Click on the AirPort symbol in the top right-hand corner and select the correct network
  • Now enter the password “WPA2-PSK”
  • Complete the procedure with “OK”
 
 
Windows 8 & Phone
Connecting WLAN with Windows Phone & Windows 8 |UPC instructions
  • Click on the «Settings» menu item
  • Select «Wi-Fi» and set the slider to «On»
  • Select the correct network
  • Enter the password «WPA2-PSK» and complete the process by clicking «Done»
 
 
Windows 7 & Vista
Establishing a WLAN connection with Windows 7 & Windows Vista | UPC instructions
  • Click on the network icon in the task bar at the bottom of your computer screen
  • Select «Wireless networks are available»
  • Select the correct network
  • Click the «Connect» button
  • Now enter the password (WPA2–PSK) and confirm with OK
 
 
Connecting WLAN with an Android device | UPC instructions
  • Press the menu button and select «Settings» 
  • Click «Wireless & Networks»
  • Make sure that the «Wi-Fi» check box is selected
  • Select the «Wi-Fi Settings» menu item
  • Select the correct network
  • Enter the password «WPA2-PSK» and complete the process by clicking «Connect»
 
 
WLAN connection with an iPad & iPhone | UPC instructions
  • Select the «Settings» menu item
  • Click on «Wi-Fi»
  • Select the correct network
  • Enter the password «WPA2-PSK» and click on «Connect»
 
 
WLAN connection Mac OS | UPC instructions
  • Click on the AirPort symbol in the top right-hand corner and select the correct network
  • Now enter the password “WPA2-PSK”
  • Complete the procedure with “OK”
 
 
Connecting WLAN with Windows Phone & Windows 8 |UPC instructions
  • Click on the «Settings» menu item
  • Select «Wi-Fi» and set the slider to «On»
  • Select the correct network
  • Enter the password «WPA2-PSK» and complete the process by clicking «Done»
 
 
Establishing a WLAN connection with Windows 7 & Windows Vista | UPC instructions
  • Click on the network icon in the task bar at the bottom of your computer screen
  • Select «Wireless networks are available»
  • Select the correct network
  • Click the «Connect» button
  • Now enter the password (WPA2–PSK) and confirm with OK
 
 

Installation modem

FAQs & instructions

Here you will find the top 5 FAQs and helpful instructions

 
 

FAQs

 
 
 
 
 
 

Understanding WLAN

Do you want to understand Wi-Fi in detail? We have put together a collection of useful terms for you.

The name of the relevant wireless standard is also synonymous with Wi-Fi: IEEE 802.11. The letter at the end provides information about the speed used, also known as the net transfer rate:

  • 802.11b is the “old” standard and achieves up to 6 Mbit/s
  • 802.11g achieves up to 22 Mbit/s
  • 802.11n is currently very widespread and achieves up to 60 Mbit/s or 120 Mbit/s depending on the bandwidth used (20MHz or 40 MHz)
  • 802.11ac is used in the 5 GHz range for newer devices and achieves up to 660 Mbit/s


The standard supported by a WLAN modem is defined in the settings. Normally, “mixed mode” is used, meaning that the modem always adapts to the connected devices.

Devices with an older standard occupy the modem for longer due to the limited transfer rate (see also “airtime”). This means there is less speed left for the other devices.

Example:
An old mobile phone with the b standard means that devices with the n standard are also throttled.


In order to optimise the transfer rate, older devices should either no longer be used via Wi-Fi or should be connected via a separate modem. Alternatively, the modem can be set to “N only”. This will mean that n devices receive the full output. Devices that do not support the n standard can then no longer be connected to the WLAN network, however.

Some examples of devices that do not support the common n standard:

  • Devices manufactured before 2009
  • iPhone 3 or older
  • Samsung Galaxy GT-i7500, Samsung Galaxy Gio
  • Sony PS3 or older
  • Older Wi-Fi printers


Devices with n standard generally also support the b and g standards.



A frequency band refers to a particular frequency range within which signals are sent. Wi-Fi waves are transmitted via the two frequency bands 2.4 GHz (GHz = gigahertz) and 5 GHz. These differ in speed and range:

  • The 2.4 GHz network radiates further but is slower due to the limited bandwidth
  • The 5 GHz network is faster but does not reach so far. Generally speaking, however, the 5 GHz network is used less and therefore offers a better connection


The Horizon HD Recorder supports both frequencies, 2.4 and 5 GHz, simultaneously (concurrent). On the other upc cablecom WLAN modems, it is possible to choose between 2.4 and 5 GHz.

Please note:
Not all devices support 5 GHz. For this reason, 2.4 GHz is the default setting. If the modem is set to 5 GHz, older devices may not be able to connect to the Wi-Fi network any more.


You can find out in the specifications or in the menu on your device whether it supports 5 GHz.

The frequency range in the 2.4 GHz band is divided into 13 channels. Although the channels are spaced 5 MHz apart, a wireless connection requires a bandwidth of 20 MHz.

Most channels overlap. Channel 3 also transmits in channels 2 and 4, for example. The non-overlapping channels 1, 6 and 11 are often used for this reason. In certain cases, it can also be helpful to consciously use another channel.

Example:
If the channels 1, 6 and 11 are very heavily occupied, the channels 3 or 4 should be selected instead, since these are unoccupied.


You can find the best channel in your area with the WLAN Optimizer:

 

WLAN Optimizer for Windows (Windows Vista or higher)

WLAN Optimizer for Mac (Os 10.9.x or higher)



The frequency range in the 5 GHz band is divided into 19 channels, between channel 36 and 140. Although a channel width of 40 MHz is normally used in the 5 GHz range, the channels do not overlap. This enables higher speed with less interference.

Generally, the lower channels have less transmission power than the upper ones. The channels between 100 and 140 transmit the furthest (1000 mW, UNII-2 extended).

Please note:
When changing channel into a higher range, it can take up to 10 minutes until the Wi-Fi connection is re-established.


The selected channel should be occupied as little as possible by other networks in the area. You can find the best channel in your area with the WLAN Optimizer:

WLAN Optimizer for Windows (Windows Vista or higher)

WLAN Optimizer for Mac (Os 10.9.x or higher)



The bandwidth of the Wi-Fi channel used can normally be configured between 20 MHz and 40 MHz. This value describes how “broad” the transmitted Wi-Fi waves are. Broader is not automatically better, however, since this means that channels overlap and interferences arise.

Our tip:
Use a bandwidth of 20 MHz in the 2.4 GHz range and a bandwidth of 40 MHz in the 5 GHz range, since the channels are spaced further apart there.



Airtime is the maximum available time in which data packets are sent in a Wi-Fi channel. All Wi-Fi devices which use the same Wi-Fi channel in a given area share this airtime. Only one device per channel can send or receive data at the same time. The higher the Wi-Fi standard (e.g. n standard), the less airtime is required to send data packets.

Since the data is divided into small data packets, the devices take turns to send. The more devices sharing a channel and the larger the data volume, the longer the transfer will take.

The distance between the end devices and the modem also influences the data throughput. The signal strength decreases with distance. For large distances, some data packages have to be sent several times so that they arrive complete. This “eats” airtime to the disadvantage of the other devices.

Please note:
Select a Wi-Fi channel that is occupied as little as possible. Make sure that devices that are far away are not affecting the performance of all devices.


Newer Wi-Fi devices have an “airtime fairness” function which uses the available capacity intelligently.



No statement can be made on the maximum Wi-Fi range, since the Wi-Fi performance depends on numerous factors. In an interference-free room without obstacles, 30 - 50 metres can be achieved. In a heavily compromised environment with lots of sources of interference, the range can be as little as 10 metres.

Tips for optimising your Wi-Fi



The figures quoted by hardware manufacturers regarding the performance of devices are generally theoretical values and cannot be achieved in practice.

The speeds that can actually be achieved depend on the Wi-Fi standard (802.11x), frequency band (2.4 or 5GHz), the bandwidth (20 or 40 MHz), the number of aerials and transfer technologies (e.g. MiMO). Often, the capabilities of the end devices (e.g. smartphone) are the limiting factor, however.



The data packets that are sent via Wi-Fi are encrypted for security reasons. There are various standards that must be supported by the modem and also by the connected devices in each case.

Two of the most common methods are AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) and TKIP. Since there are older devices that do not support AES, the default setting is normally “AES + TKIP”.

AES is an improved encryption transfer method for data. AES allows higher speeds. This setting should only be used if all devices used also support AES, however. Otherwise, these devices will no longer be able to connect to the Wi-Fi network.

 
 

Change your WLAN password regularly

For security reasons, you should change your WLAN password on a regular basis. We recommend that you change the pre-defined passwords you received with the modem or router immediately after taking delivery of the device.


A few tips for a secure password:

  • The password should be at least 20 characters long
  • se a random series of letters, numbers and special characters (?!%+$ etc.) written in both upper case and lower case (please refrain from using international special characters such as ä, é, à, ñ or §).
  • Avoid re-using previous passwords.
  • Please remember to change the password in both frequency ranges (2.4Ghz and 5Ghz).

How to change your WLAN password

Horizon

Connect your computer, smartphone or tablet to the Internet of your Horizon Box, open your Internet browser and enter the following address in the address line: gwlogin.net

 

Enter "admin" as both the user name and the password.

  • Click on "Wireless" at the top right.
  • Now click on "Security" in the vertical menu on the left-hand side.
  • You can set a new password for your WLAN network in the "Passphrase" field.
  • Once you have changed your password, you must connect your devices (smartphone, tablet or laptop) to the WLAN again and enter the new password. 
Thomson

Please note the following information: leave the user field empty and enter “admin” as the password.

 

Connect your computer, smartphone or tablet to the Internet of your Thomson modem, open your Internet browser and enter the following address in the address line: 192.168.0.1. A small window opens: please enter the information noted above.

  • Click on the top menu item "Wireless".
  • Then click on the "Primary Network" section on the left-hand side.
  • You can change the name of your WLAN under "Network Name (SSID)".
  • You can now change the password under "WPA Pre-Shared Key".
  • Once you have changed your password, you must connect your devices (smartphone, tablet or laptop) to the WLAN again and enter the new password.
Technicolor

Connect your computer, smartphone or tablet to the Internet of your Technicolor modem, open your Internet browser and enter the following address in the address line: 192.168.0.1

 

Use "admin" as both the user name and password or use your personalised login.

  • Click on the top menu item "Wireless".
  • Now click on the "Security" section on the left-hand side.
  • You can now change the password under "Passphrase".
  • Once you have changed your password, you must connect your devices (smartphone, tablet or laptop) to the WLAN again and enter the new password.
Ubee

Connect your computer, smartphone or tablet to the Internet of your Ubee modem, open your Internet browser and enter the following address in the address line: 192.168.0.1

 

Use "admin" as both the user name and password or use your personalised login.

  • Click on the top menu item "Wireless".
  • Now click on the "Security" section on the left-hand side.
  • You can change the password under "Passphrase".
  • Once you have changed your password, you must connect your devices (smartphone, tablet or laptop) to the WLAN again and enter the new password.
Connect Box

Connect your computer, smartphone or tablet to the Internet of your Connect Box, open your Internet browser and enter the following address in the address line: 192.168.0.1

 

You will find the password on the bottom of your modem under "Settings password".

  • Click on "Configure your WLAN connection" on the welcome page of the Admin space.
  • You can now change the network name and password.
  • Once you have changed your password, you must connect your devices (smartphone, tablet or laptop) to the WLAN again and enter the new password.

FAQs & instructions

Here you will find the top 5 FAQs and helpful instructions

 
 

FAQs